Val Verde County Historical Commission

Val Verde County Historical Commission

Police Department History for the City of Del Rio

 

B.A. Borroum was the first law enforcement for the City. Borroum was a rancher or cattleman from Southeast Texas. "In 1866 Monroe Choate and B.A. Borroum drove a herd to Iowa to find a market. They crossed Red River at Colbert's Ferry, went by way of Boggy Depot, crossed the Arkansas at Fort Gibson, and then struck west of the settlements of Kansas." Borroum himself recollected "My first experience on the trail was in the year 1870. About the first of April of that year I started from Monroe Choate's Ranch in Karnes County with a herd of cattle belonging to Choate & Bennett." He continued to drive cattle through the 1870s and 1880s, and in the later years drove cattle "for the firm of Borroum & Choate."1 It is not known when Borroum arrived in Del Rio, but he was elected to the Del Rio School Board on May 9, 1899.2
B.A. Borroum
Borroum took his office as City Marshall with the other officials on July 25, 1905 after taking an oath; he was "City Marshall," an title used in the early years (with an occasional reference to Chief of Police). His salary was $75 per month. During the first year the City Commission added a number of things to his job description. The City Marshall was responsible for the street sprinkler driver and team, for collecting "fines, dog taxes, etc.," for "boarding prisoners," dog licenses and "hauling off dead dogs." He was also to "impound all horses, jacks, jennets and cattle to be found running at large within...the City of Del Rio."3 Later in his career, Borroum was elected County Commissioner, Precinct One-in 1922 and again in 1926.4

The City records stop in 1906 and do not resume until 1911. No law enforcement officers are listed during the gap.

H.W. Dockery was appointed City Marshall December 20, 1911 at a diminished rate of $40 per month. The C.M. still had the responsibility for stray dogs and the pound and was to "notify any and all persons [maintaining] a nuisance, to clean up their premises at once." Dockery was reappointed May 21, 1912 but resigned August 6, 1912.5

Gil C. Pace was appointed August 6, 1912 to the City Marshall's position at a $60 per month salary. He resigned January 15, 19136

A motion was made on December 12, 1912 to abolish the office of City Marshall-for reasons not specified. The motion failed.7

Pablo S. Flores, meanwhile was appointed on September 10, 1912 "Policeman for East Del Rio," the name used for the San Felipe neighborhood east of San Felipe Creek. He received no regular pay but was "to be paid the fees that may accrue in his arrest only." His appointment was annulled just a week later on September 17.8

Benito Rodriguez was appointed "special policeman in and for East Del Rio" on October 24, 1912. Once again, no salary was offered; pay was to come from "fees made out of his arrests only."9

M. L. Whistler was appointed as City Marshall on January 18, 1913 at $60 per month.10

Dario Cuellar was appointed Special Policeman for East Del Rio on April 8, 1913. His service was discontinued October 6, 1914 "on account of him being accused of murder while acting as policeman of the City of Del Rio." He must have been cleared or acquitted because he was not in prison during the summer of 1915.11

W. J. Burns was selected June 11, 1913 "to act as Marshall" and furnish a wagon and tea to work the streets (for a total of $75 per month). The City dispensed with his services on January 3, 1914. When the next C.M. was fired, Burns was appointed again on July 23, 1914 with $45 per month pay. He was dismissed on March 13, 1915.12

Alfred R. Baker, "a deputy sheriff of Val Verde County, Texas, in his stead," was appointed at $20 per month on January 3, 1914. On July 23, 1914, the City Commissioners announced that they were "dispensing wit the services" of Baker and reappointing Burns.13

Jacinto Vann was appointed as policeman of the City of Del Rio March 10, 1914 with duties supervised by the City Marshall "provided that the said policeman shall not exercise any authority except in the Mexican portion of the city" with pay from fines collected. Vann left the City when he was appointed deputy sheriff of Val Verde County.14

H. G. Edwards was appointed City Marshall at a higher $60 per month on March 13, 1915 and resigned July 13, 1915.15

J. B. Osgood was appointed July 3, 1915 as special policeman of the City of Del Rio at $12.50 per week. When H.G. Edwards resigned July 13, 1915, Osgood was appointed City Marshall, an office he held through April 15, 1916. During the summer of 1916, he was paid $7.50 for night patrol. Osgood was on the City payroll in February 1917 as Traffic Marshall until the office was eliminated May 14, 1917.16

P. J. Schier was hired as a "special officer mounted" on November 9, 1915 and paid $10. He was paid $22 on January 11, 1916; this time identified as a "mounted Deputy Marshall."17

H. L. Moore was hired as a "special policeman" and paid $4 on December 14, 1915. He appeared on the 1916 summer payroll again-$15 for 15 nights-for service of Watchman Spec. Police.18

D. Timberlake was appointed as City Marshall April 15, 1916 at an increased pay of $70 month. He was still C.M. but was paid $7.50 during the summer of 1916 for night patrol. Timberlake was also Fire Marshall during August 1915 through April 1917.19 Some sort of controversy occurred during the late summer of 1917. The record states "that a minute record bear evidence that upon Aug. 1st 1917 D. Timberlake was called upon for his resignation as City Marshall" which would be effective as of that date. Timberlake had agreed to submit a written resignation in lou of City Commission "demanding the immediate resignation or otherwise humiliating one of its officers." However, the resignation was never presented, and the Commission fired Timberlake on October 18, 1917, but dated the firing to August 1.20

The City of Del Rio instituted a night curfew on May 9, 1916. During the summer of 1916 the city and county shared the expenses of "two special night policemen" hired by the county but under the direction of the City Marshall. The City was paying one-third, and the county two-thirds. On June 26, 1916 the county had discontinued its payments, and the City Commission agreed to pay the full costs. Several past lawmen were paid money on a nightly or weekly basis.21

A. R. Baker was on the payroll during summer 1916 for night patrol for 10 nights at a cost of $25.22

Frank Wilson was also on the payroll during summer 1916 for night patrol for 10 nights at a cost of $25.23

Edward Long appeared on the 1916 summer payroll again-$15 for 15 nights-for service of Watchman Spec. Police.24

T. A. Turk was paid $10 for night watch on September 12, 1916 and again through April 1917. Turk was appointed policeman on July 10, 1923.25

On May 14, 1917 "the City Marshall and the City Attorney [were] instructed to close all houses of prostitution."26

W. F. Ratarrie was appointed "special officer" on August 14, 1917 and appointed "marshall" on August 28, 1917, but he resigned on January 25, 1918.27

James H. King was appointed City Marshall on January 25, 1918 with five men appointed "deputy marshals or policemen for the City."28 After the new city charter, King was referred to as "Chief of Police" at some times (for example, page 49) and "City Marshall" at others (for example, page 85).29

E. Q [?] Simmons: appointed deputy marshal on January 25, 1918.30

Bolding dates, still need to bold names.

Alberto Ramirez: appointed deputy marshal on January 25, 1918 but whose deputation was cancelled March 12, 1918.31

Magricio Valadez: appointed deputy marshal on January 25, 1918.32

Thomas Turk: appointed deputy marshal on January 25, 1918.33 (This person might be T.A. Turk previously listed-or a relation.) On September 8, 1925, "Tom Turk Night Watchman was called before the City Commission to discuss the taking away the night watch clock by the City Marshall on account of him being caught gaming." The Commission decided to let the matter be resolved by the C.M. and no resolution was recorded.34

George Harrold: appointed deputy marshal on January 25, 1918.35

Teodora Solis was appointed deputy marshal to replace Alberto Ramirez on March 12, 1918.36

In 1918 the townsfolk of Del Rio adopted a home rule city charter. Section 34 of that charter called for a "City Marshal" and a number of "policemen."
On January 11, 1921 the City Commission passed on ordinance to appoint five "deputy city marshalls."37

T. M. McFarland, in the January 11, 1921, was appointed deputy city marshal at a pay of $100.38

John S. Wolford was appointed City Marshall on May 16, 1922 at $100 per month which increased to $115 November 14, 1922. His resignation was accepted on June 12, 1923.39

D. N. Williams was appointed deputy city marshal on July 11, 1922 at $50 per month.40

M. I. Sharp was appointed "Chief of Police" effective June 15, 1923 at $115 per month. His resignation was accepted November 13, 1923 as was City Commissioner T.A. Nunley's. (This may or may not be related.)41

J. A. Martin was appointed policeman on July 10, 1923.42

Jim Mosley was appointed policeman on July 10, 1923.43

J. T. Laughlin was appointed City Marshall effected November 2, 1923 at $150 plus fees collected. His appointment was made before the previous C.M. Sharp had resigned. Over the years the C.M. was often responsible for the city pound; on December 11, 1923, the C.M. was directed to select a site for a new public pound and to maintain it. He was also later appointed Fire Marshall, an appointment effective January 15, 1926. On August 10, 1926, the Commission minutes read "Motion was made by Commissioner Jno. Y. Long and seconded by Commissioner A. McDougald that City Marshall J.T. Laughlin tender his resignation as City Marshall of the City, motion carried. At the September 14 meeting, the "resignation of Mr. J.T. Laughlin was accepted. This was immediately followed by "The application of Mr. J.P. Hodges for City Marshal was read and tabled." Hodges, apparently never became City Marshall.44

Joe Jackson was appointed "Special Officer for the month of October" on October 14, 1924 at $3.50 per day.45

C. M. Blackwell was appointed "deputy City Marshal and traffic officer" at $125 per month on January 12, 1926.46

A June 8, 1926 City Commission defined the duties of the City Marshall. In September of 1927, the City ordered 3 uniforms for the Police Department, "uniforms to comply with the State law." Two years later (on May 14, 1929) the Commission allowed each policeman $30 twice per year for uniforms.47

H. L. Bridge is recorded as being Chief of Police on May 8, 1928 (even though the last recorded Chief/Marshall—Laughlin—left office September 14, 1926.48

Chas. Stewart was noted as Traffic officer on May 8, 1928, though no date of hiring was recorded.49

Robert LeRoy was hired as special Policeman at $25 per month on March 12, 1929. This pay was increased to $35 September 10, 1929 and to $60 per month April 19, 1932. The resignation of "Bob Lee Roy" was accepted on April 8, 1936. "Bob LeRoy" was appointed on May 3, 1938 (effective April 13, 1938) after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $80 plus a gasoline allowance.50

Popo Coronado also resigned on April 8, 1936, but his appointed does not appear to be recorded.51

T. G. Myers was hired as a Policeman at $85 per month on March 12, 1929. His pay was increased to $110 July 9, 1929. Myers and C.E. Clark switched jobs (sort of) on April 30, 1932 to be effective May 1 when Myers became City Marshall at $135 per month.52

Harry Stewart was hired on July 9, 1929 at $110 per month.53

J. C. Musgraves was hired on July 9, 1929 at $100 per month.54

C. J. Blackwell was appointed Special Policeman at $100 per month on September 10, 1929. (Could this be C.M. Blackwell?)55

Charley Lockhart was a deputy sheriff for Val Verde County April 19, 1932 when the City agreed to pay one-half of his salary up to $55 per month. He was appointed Policeman on June 14, 1932 for the period May 1 to October 1, 1932 at $110 per month with the expectation that the county would pay his salary for the subsequent six months.56

C. E. Clark was appointed City Marshall on April 19, 1932 to be effective May 1, 1932. The motion passed but the Mayor "registered objection" for unrecorded reasons. At the April 30, 1932 Commission, Clark was appointed City Policeman at $125 per month while T.G. Myers became Marshall. Clark's services were discontinued at the July 12, 1932 meeting, but the discontinuance was backdated to July 157

W. H. Tompson was appointed April 26, 1932 as night watchman at $75 per month to begin May 1, 1932.58

Apolonio Flores was recorded as "watchman for warehouses along Railroad track" but someone who also "holds a commission as policeman." He was being reappointed on April 26, 1932 but he was "not to draw a salary from the City."59

Abb Turk was discontinued as night watchman on April 26, 1932, but not date of hiring is recorded. He was reappointed policeman on July 6, 1933, backdated to July 1 at $75 per month. He was cut on December 1, 1933 "due to reduction of operating expense." Turk appears on the 1942 payroll at $115 per month as Assistant Chief of the Fire Department. On August 12, 1942, Turk was employed as a policeman. An Albert Turk was appointed in 1953 at a night watchman in the downtown district. His pay consisted of $20 from the City and the remainder of the unspecified salary from the merchants. He was still on payroll May 11, 1954.60

Cole Y. Blackwell was appointed City Marshall May 2, 1933, effective May 1, at a salary of $135 per month. He offered his resignation on October 16, 1934. Blackwell was appointed Chief of Police on April 12, 1938 after a major shakeup in City Hall. He was replaced on April 29, 1940 by W.F. Brown.61

Amos Humphreys was "appointed Policeman for the City of Del Rio, under the [pay sharing] agreement that was with the county with Charlie Lockhart" on May 2, 1933. He was appointed City Marshal at $135 per month on October 16, 1934. His salary (as Amos Humphrey) was later increased to $150.62

Pedro Barrera was appointed Special Policeman and Truant Officer on November 14, 1933.63

Demitro Castanedo was appointed Special Policeman and Truant Officer on November 14, 1933.64

J. S. Tabor was appointed watchman (but not special policeman) on April 10, 1934.65

J. P. Allen was appointed watchman (but not special policeman) on April 10, 1934.66

L. D. Clinkenbeard was appointed watchman (but not special policeman) on April 10, 1934.67

G. L. Grimes was appointed watchman (but not special policeman) on April 10, 1934.68

Jim Moseley was appointed watchman (but not special policeman) on April 10, 1934.69

At the May 1, 1934 City Commission meeting, the commissioners stated that "there are a great number of suspicious characters roaming over the county, a great many of them being desperate men" and ordered the arrest of suspicious characters for 72 hours with no warrant.70

Frank Gallaway was appointed "Pound Master and Special Policeman" at $65 per month on July 3, 1934. Frank Galloway, Sr. was appointed warehouse watchman at $15 per week on May 3, 1938 after the big City Hall shakeup.71

Calvin Wallen was appointed Policeman at $110 per month on October 16, 1934. His pay was later increased to $120.72

Chon Cerda was appointed Special Policeman in Chihuahua temporarily at the November 20, 1934 meeting, appointment to be effective on November 15, 1934. He was to be paid for $40 per month.73

Dennys Hays was appointed policeman to take the place of Herman Huebner who resigned. Hays' salary was $110 per month, and the appointment made at the October 31, 1935. His pay was increased to $120 later. Dennie Hays was appointed on May 3, 1938 (effective April 13, 1938) after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $110 plus a gasoline allowance. Hays was elected City Commissioner at the April 2, 1940 election, took his place on the City Commission on April 9, became Mayor Pro Tem on April 11, and on April 18 was designated Commissioner in charge of the Fire and Police Departments.74

Herman Huebner may have been appointed policeman on June 12, 1934.75

Melchoir Garcia was appointed policeman April 8, 1936 at $110 per month to be effective immediately.76

Harold Larson was appointed policeman April 8, 1936 at $110 per month to be effective immediately.77

G. Guardia was "dispensed with" on April 8, 1936-but not date of hire is apparent.78

Frank Hernandez was appointed in Guardia's place at $50 per month on April 8, 1936.79

On April 12, 1938 the newly elected City Commission fired all City employees, including, apparently, the police. Past City Marshall Cole Y. Blackwell was appointed Chief of Police at that same meeting. The May 3, 1938 City Commission meeting minutes record what appears to be the hiring of the entire police department (and fire department and other departments). Some of the hires were past police officers.80 After the April 2, 1940 election, "The newly elected Mayor asked that all employees continue as before until further arrangements were made." A new chief, W.F. Brown, would be appointed within a month.81 The Mayor and Commissioners were voted out of office in 1942, replaced by a new slate, and there was another shakeup in the police department and in other city offices.82

Joe Crandall was appointed on May 3, 1938 (effective April 15, 1938) after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $110 plus a gasoline allowance.83

Merced Hernandez was appointed on May 3, 1938 (effective April 13, 1938) after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $60 plus a gasoline allowance.84

Bill Bishop was appointed on May 3, 1938 (effective May 4, 1938) after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $110 but without the gasoline allowance. On October 4, 1938, he was placed as Street Patrolman at $110 per month. He resigned effective February 23, 1939.85

Earl Scudday was appointed on May 3, 1938 (effective May 1, 1938) after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $110 plus a gasoline allowance.86

Henry Bridge was appointed on May 3, 1938 after the big City Hall shakeup at a salary of $15 per week as warehouse watchman from April 12 through April 30, "and as Poundman and Policeman in Chihuahua at $90.00 per month from May 1st with no car or gasoline allowance."87

Wesley Witty was appointed Sergeant at $60 per month on October 4, 1938.88

Elige McBee was appointed to replace Bill Bishop with the effective date of February 23, 1939.89

At the April 18, 1940 Commissioners meeting, the East Side Police Station was relocated from its "present [unidentified] location" to the Lulac Building which has been offered to the Police Department free of charge. Gas utilities were hooked into the station in November 1940, and the department received permission to purchase a heater.90 The minutes of the June 11, 1946 Commission meeting state that this stationhouse was to be moved to an office previously used as a water collecting office, effective June 21.91

W.F. Brown was appointed Chief of Police at a "Special called meeting of the City Commission for purpose of appointing a New Chief of Police." The appointment was made April 29, 1940, and his pay was $150 per month plus gasoline. Brown resigned effective October 14, 1941.92

Walter A. Russel was appointed "City Marshall and/or Chief of Police" to replace Brown. His appointment was made November 4, 1941 but lasted only through the next election, after which he was replaced by R.C. Hawkins.93

The Police Department purchased its first short-wave radio set in September 1940, and in October of the same year, the Department purchased jackets for the officers. In August 1945, the City bought uniforms for the officers. Two-way radios were bought in 1953.94 In July 1941, the Commission discussed building a new police and fire building; there was more talk in October because the Old City Hall building was falling apart.95 On January 6, 1942, after Pearl Harbor, the Mayor was empowered to appoint "special police" without pay to help with "blackout or air raid prevention." These officers were required to wear special identification emblem.96

R. C. [Red?] Hawkins was appointed Chief of Police on April 14, 1942 after the city election at $150 per month salary. He survived the elections of 1944, 1946, 1948 and 1950 suggesting a period of greater stability within the department. After the 1952 election, Hawkins was transferred from Chief (at $230 per month) to patrolman (at $195 per month).97

Hawkins and the following people were on the payroll on April 14, 1942, so all officers not on the following list were dismissed before or at the April 14, 1942 City Commission meeting. The four new officers and two guards were-- Jim Lathan at $100 per month as a policeman.98

Joe Crandall at $100 per month as a policeman.99

Chelo Hernandez at $85 per month as a policeman.100

Samuel Perez at $85 per month as a policeman but was discharged effective May 15, 1942. He was back on the payroll in October 1943, and on March 11, 1952, at which time he got a $5 per month raise for serving continuously for ten years at Patrolman.101

J. W. Fisher at $75 per month as guard at City water tanks, but the job was cancelled effective September 1, 1942.102

H. Averill at $75 per month as guard at City water tanks, but the job was cancelled effective September 1, 1942.103

Ray Fisher, a former fire fighter, was employed as a policeman on August 12, 1942.104

Felix Barrera was employed in the Police Department at $85 per month effective February 13, 1943.105

On February 19, 1948 all police and fire department employees became civil service employees after a citywide, January election approving the action. Later that year, September 29, all police officer and fire fighters received a pay raise to a minimum of $165 per month "as prescribed by State Civil Service requirements." The pay increase was effective October 6. At the time the City had five regular police officers and three fire fighters. A Firemen's and Policemen's Civil Service Commission was established, first with three members, then with five.106

Adolfo Moya, whose date of hire is unknown, was eliminated as part-time night watchman in San Felipe as of April 14, 1950. All other City employees were to "remain in present status."107

In 1950 the two police stations were consolidated. Additionally, a decision was made that police officers were to cease using their personal vehicles on duty. On November 24, 1950 a bid was accepted to buy the department's first car, a Plymouth Sedan, for $1,400. In December 1952, two more cars were purchased. Another was purchased April 4, 1955.108

Charles Stewart, whose date of hire is unknown, resigned November 2, 1950.109

Herman Richter was appointed by the Mayor as Chief of Police effective April 9, 1952, replacing Chief Hawkins. On May 13, the City Commission approved the appointment. He was still on payroll, at $260 per month, May 11, 1954 but resigned effective December 1, 1954.110

L. A. McNutt was hired as a special night patrol policeman along Highway 90 effective October 16, 1952. The City paid $20 per month, while the merchants paid the balance of his unspecified salary. He was still on payroll May 11, 1954.111

The March 16, 1953 payroll shows that some officers were no longer with the department, and other men had been hired. Serving under Chief Richter were four patrolmen and L.A. McNutt at part-time patrolman. The four were-

Rinaldo Antinone as Patrolman at $220 per month (during March 16, 1953). At the April 14, 1953 Commission meeting a resolution was moved that "Policeman R.J. Antinone be released from the department April 15th, 1953. This action due to numerous adverse reports on Mr. Antinone and conduct unbecoming a policeman." The motion carried.112

Ruben C. Forth as Patrolman at $220 per month (during March 16, 1953). He was still on payroll May 11, 1954.113

Miguel Constancio, Jr. as Patrolman at $220 per month (during March 16, 1953). He was still on payroll May 11, 1954.114

John Caffey as Patrolman at $220 per month (during March 16, 1953). He was not on payroll May 11, 1954.115

Calvin Wallen was appointed patrolman September 25, 1953 at $220 per month. He was still on payroll May 11, 1954.116

James Koog was appointed patrolman October 16, 1953 at $220 per month. He was still on payroll May 11, 1954.117

I. R. Barrera was appointed patrolman October 16, 1953 at $220 per month. Indalecio Barrera was still on payroll May 11, 1954.118

E. H. Kirchner was on payroll May 11, 1954 as patrolman, but his date of hire is unknown.119

John Qualia was on payroll May 11, 1954 as parking meter patrolman at $225 per month, but his date of hire is unknown.120

Charles W. McBee was appointed Chief of Police effective January 1, 1955.121

Otis Crenshaw was appointed parking meter patrolman effective January 1, 1955.122


Footnotes--

1
 
J.N. Blyer, "Got 'Wild and Woolly' On The Chisholm Trail," page 114 and B.A. Borroum, "Recollections of Old Trail Days," pages 117-119, both in J. Marvin Hunter, The Trail Drivers of Texas, Volume One, New York: Argosy-Antiquarian Ltd., 1963.
2Val Verde County Clerk's Office (VVCCO), Record of Election Returns Vol. 1, page 46.
3City of Del Rio, Minutes Book #1, page 1 (June 30, 1905); page 16; page 25; page 27; page 30; page 36; page 39; page 43; page 48.
4VVCCO, Record of Election Returns Vol. 1, page 125; Vol. 2, page 9.
5City of Del Rio, Minutes Book #1, page 57 (December 20, 1911); page 60; page 67; page 71; page 75.
6Book #1, page 75; page 85.
7Book #1, page 82.
8Book #1, pages 77-78.
9Book #1, page 80.
10Book #1, page 86.
11Book #1, page 90; page 184; page 218.
12Book #1, page 98; page 122; page 176; page 201.
13Book #1, page 122; page 176.
14Book #1, page 146; page 228.
15Book #1, page 201; page 218.
16Book #1, page 217; page 219; page 248; page 260; page 307; page 308; page 316.
17Book #1, page 232; page 236.
18Book #1, page 234; page 265.
19Book #1, page 248; page 260; page 28? (December 12, 1916); page 307, 308, 312.
20Book #1, page 339.
21Book #1, page 249; page 258.
22Book #1, page 260.
23Book #1, page 260.
24Book #1, page 265.
25Book #1, page 270, 277, 283, 289, 307, 308, 312; Book #2, page 59.
26Book #1, page 316.
27Book #1, page 335, 337-339, 347.
28Book #1, page 347.
29City of Del Rio, City Ordinance Book #1 (the smaller #1), pages 15, 49.
30City of Del Rio, Minutes Book #1, page 347.
31Book #1, page 347, 349.
32Book #1, page 347.
33Book #1, page 347.
34Book #1, page 191.
35Book #1, page 347.
36Book #1, page 349.
37City of Del Rio, City Ordinance Book #1, page 155.
38City of Del Rio, City Ordinance Book #1, page 155.
39City Minutes Book #2, pages 30, 38, 58.
40Book #2, page 34.
41Book #2, page 58; page 78.
42Book #2, page 59.
43Book #2, page 59.
44Book #2, page 78; page 82; page 206; page 250; page 251.
45Book #2, page 132.
46Book #2, page 206.
47Book #2, page 241; page 262; page 355.
48Book #2, page 286.
49Book #2, page 286.
50Book #2, page 353; page 393; page 482; Book #3, page 341; Book #4, page 7.
51Book #3, page 341.
52Book #2, page 353; page 384; page 487.
53Book #2, page 384.
54Book #2, page 384.
55Book #2, page 393.
56Book #2, page 482; page 495.
57Book #2, page 482; page 487; page 499.
58Book #2, page 484.
59Book #2, page 484.
60Book #2, page 484; Book #3, pages 21, 39; Book #4, pages 415, 429; Book #5, page 488.
61Book #3, page 12; page 155; Book #4, page, 2, 197, 203-204.
62Book #3, page 12; page 155; page 355.
63Book #3, page 39.
64Book #3, page 39.
65Book #3, page 58-C.
66Book #3, page 58-C.
67Book #3, page 58-C.
68Book #3, page 58-C.
69Book #3, page 58-C.
70Book #3, page 58-D.
71Book #3, page 121; Book #4, page 7.
72Book #3, page 155; page 355.
73Book #3, page 165.
74Book #3, page 322, 355; Book #4, pages 7, 188, 190, 191.
75Loose note of unknown authorship, found in Book #3.
76Book #3, page 341.
77Book #3, page 341.
78Book #3, page 341.
79Book #3, page 341.
80Book #4, page 2; page 7.
81Book #4, page 2; page 7.
82Book #4, page 413-415.
83Book #4, page 7.
84Book #4, page 7.
85Book #4, page 7, 107, 126.
86Book #4, page 7.
87Book #4, page 7.
88Book #4, page 107.
89Book #4, page 126.
90Book #4, page 191, 309.
91Book #5, page 76.
92Book #4, page 197, 383.
93Book #4, page 387, 414.
94Book #4, page 302, 309; Book #5, pages 50, 405, 407-408.
95Book #4, page 371, 384, 385.
96Book #4, page 395.
97Book #4, page 414; Book #5, pages 5, 70, 121, 126, 195, 310.
98Book #4, page 414.
99Book #4, page 414.
100Book #4, page 414.
101Book #4, page 415, 420, 463; Book #5, pages 299.
102Book #4, page 415, 429.
103Book #4, page 415, 429.
104Book #4, page 416, 429.
105Book #4, page 445.
106Book #5, page 112, 119-121, 124, 130, 137, 329.
107Book #5, page 195.
108Book #5, page 221-222, 226, 387; Book #6, page 127.
109Book #5, page 222.
110Book #5, page 319, 326, 488; Book #6, page 100.
111Book #5, page 369, 488.
112Book #5, page 403, 407.
113Book #5, page 403, 488.
114Book #5, page 403, 488.
115Book #5, page 403, 488.
116Book #5, page 446, 488.
117Book #5, page 451, 488.
118Book #5, page 451, 488.
119Book #5, page 488.
120Book #5, page 488.
121Book #6, page 100.
122Book #6, page 100.